Difference between Frame Rate and Shutter Speed

Frame Rate: The number of individual frames that are recorded each second.

Shutter Speed: How long each frame is exposed for.

Both frame rate and shutter speed affect the motion blur of your footage. In the image below the purple segments represent the recorded footage and you can see how frame rate and shutter speed work together:
framevshutter

3 comments for “Difference between Frame Rate and Shutter Speed

  1. Sudeep Dwivedi
    September 30, 2014 at 11:11 am

    Hello.
    First, I would like to thank you for this wonderfully made information portal about using DSLRs for shooting video. The language for the articles could not be more simpler while being satisfyingly explanatory.

    I have a query about Frame Rate vs Shutter Speed thing which, I would like to share with you.

    Like you explained, shutter speed is how long each frame is exposed for. Because I don’t have ND filters, while shooting scenes in bright daylight with aperture wide open, I have, at many times, cranked up the shutter speed to up to 1/500 and even more while recording video. Then, when I would play the video in VLC or any other player I could see horizontal lines cutting through the video. BUT! When on importing the video into Premiere Pro CS6 those lines would vanish all together. And the exported final video would play as smooth and as normal as any other video.

    I did try to find answer to this thing but couldn’t. And that is why, after experimenting it quite enough times, I now use it freely while shooting videos and hence, I don’t feel the need for ND filters.

    Would you please comment with your observation on this thing?

    Thank you!

  2. Sudeep Dwivedi
    September 30, 2014 at 11:12 am

    Hello.
    First, I would like to thank you for this wonderfully made information portal about using DSLRs for shooting video. The language for the articles could not be more simpler while being satisfyingly explanatory.

    I have a query about Frame Rate vs Shutter Speed thing which, I would like to share with you.

    Like you explained, shutter speed is how long each frame is exposed for. Because I don’t have ND filters, while shooting scenes in bright daylight with aperture wide open, I have, at many times, cranked up the shutter speed to up to 1/500 and even more while recording video. Then, when I would play the video in VLC or any other player I could see horizontal lines cutting through the video. BUT! When on importing the video into Premiere Pro CS6 those lines would vanish all together. And the exported final video would play as smooth and as normal as any other video.

    I did try to find answer to this thing but couldn’t. And that is why, after experimenting it quite enough times, I now use it freely while shooting videos and hence, I don’t feel the need for ND filters.

    Would you please comment with your observation on this thing?

    Thank you!

    • H. Jay Dunmore
      October 31, 2014 at 5:34 am

      There are a few reasons why the video would display that way.
      First that comes to mind is the screen dimensions. I have found when displaying video on your computer, slightly resizing the screen can result in smoother playback.
      Another can be the type of video file that you’re playing back. Some are harder to display than others. VLC viewer is good for looking at files. I also like MPEG Streamclip as well.

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